One Service App vs Social Media : Which one works better?



If you spotted someone ignoring Safe Distancing Measures, what would you do?



You could do the following option

1) Approach the person and inform him/her of the offence and hope they listen. Help them if needed

2) Report via One-Service App

3) Take a photo or Video and post on Facebook or Instagram

4) Do Nothing.



Most would avoid the first approach as confronting a stranger in public would not be the first instinct of many. For many, they may choose to adopt the last method, turning a blind eye to what was committed. Yet, there are some who would do the right thing and report to the authorities via One-Service App while others play vigilantes and post in on Facebook.

For those who opt to expose the deed. Which one do you think would garner more attention and perhaps a response from the authority?

One Service App
The app had was developed by the Singapore Government. It is meant as a convenient channel for reporting municipal issues with Singapore including issues on the facilities in the estates such as roads, drains, pests and so forth. With the recent introduction, it had also included reporting of Safe Distancing Act.

Theoretically, it provided a good platform for residents to report misdeeds such as breaking of Circuit Breaker Measures. However, what was lacking was the response time that it will take for authorities to look into the matter.

Here are some feedbacks on the app




Apparently, from the feedbacks provided, there is a lack of action despite reporting. Some had even tried to report on multiple occasions yet the infringement still occurs.

Until today, there is no specific or prominent case that was highlighted as a result of a submission to One Service. This added more doubts if One Service works well as a public reporting tool.


Social Media
An alternative to the app would be the use of Social Media by vigilantes. While it is good to go through the proper channel of reporting, it would seem that cases highlighted on social media tend to pick up more traction and attention.

Here are some recent examples

Ba Kut Teh Mah


Man who was supposed to serve SNH went out to eat Bak Kut Teh and post about it on FB. He was called out by his friend. As a result, he was caught and sentenced to 6 weeks in jail.


Sovereign Lady

Woman not wearing a mask and creating a scene when told to do so insisting that she is Sovereign. Her antics were captured on film and shared on social media. She is currently being charged for the offence among other violations.

Robertson Quay

A large group of people spotted gathering and drinking at Robertson Quay. Some ignored safe distancing measures and choose not to wear masks. As a result of this post, increased patrol was arranged for Roberston Quay. Some of the crowd were also picked up to be charged.


One Service vs Social Media
As seen from the examples, it would seem that posting on social media would tend to generate an immediate response to the situation. One reason would be that it is highly visible especially if it goes viral.

Comparatively, the perception of inaction and the lack of high profile cases seem to undermine the effectiveness of One Service. However, in reality, we would not know the effectiveness since the results of the submission was never made public. 

Given these incidents, the public seems to have more faith in Social Media than going through the proper channels when it comes to reporting of Circuit Breaker Measures. However, online vigilantes should not be encouraged as at times they might be targeted at innocent people. That had been cases of postings of elderly and intellectually challenged folks who might appear to break circuit breaker measures. While they might be in the wrong, there might be mitigating factors to their actions. Judging them by posting the acts on social media would not benefit anyone. In some cases, it may even lead to unwanted doxxing incidents thereby exacerbating the misdeeds.


Even when we lift the CB on June 2, certain restrictions will continue to be in place. The reality is that there will be people who will still flout the laws.

While One Service may be perceived to be a 'token to gesture with no function', it is still the app to use for official reporting. Nonetheless, for the benefit of the public, there should be proof that it is not a futile exercise. For starters, a report on how many submissions were made via the app during this period and what actions had been taken on the reports would boost the public's confidence in this app.

The public needs to have faith in the policies rolled out. If not, it is just a meaningless exercise that has lots of teeth, but no bite.

Do you use One Service App?
What is your experience?

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